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Toughest rules yet to regulate illegally reclaimed land use

CHINA has introduced its toughest regulation on land reclamation along the country’s coastline, vowing to demolish illegally reclaimed land and stop approving general reclamation projects. The State Oceanic Administration said yesterday that it would demolish or shut down all illegally reclaimed land and illegally established waste discharge outlets that damage the marine environment. Lin Shanqing, deputy director of the SOA, said at a press conference that reclamation projects that did not concern the national economy and people’s livelihoods would not be approved in future. “Reclamation projects that have been approved but have not started and do not comply with the current policy will all be stopped,” Lin said, adding that the administration would also stop giving annual land reclamation quotas to provinces. “Using reclaimed land for commercial real estate development is prohibited and all reclamation activities in the Bohai Sea area will be banned,” Lin said. “Reclaimed land that has remain deserted for a long time will be confiscated.” Furthermore, the power of granting administrative approval for land reclamation projects must not be delegated to lower authorities and administrators, who have behaved improperly in project approval, and supervision will be held accountable. Since the law on administration of maritime space use was put into use in 2002, China legally approved a total of 158,000 hectares of land reclamation by the end of 2017, accounting for about 12 percent of the newly added construction land area in coastal areas over the same period. Gross ocean production accounts for 9.5 percent of China’s GDP, statistics show. The State Oceanic Administration yesterday disclosed the findings of a nationwide survey on land-based sources of marine pollution. A total of some 9,600 such sources, including about 740 rivers, 7,500 sewage outlets and 1,350 emergency flood outlets, were identified in the survey. Among the sewage outlets, only 8 percent were licensed, and about a quarter were established in ecologically sensitive areas such as protection zones, offshore wetlands and fisheries, according to the SOA. It found, on the basis of the data in the past five years, the marine environment near more than 80 percent of sewage outlets failed to meet standards. In addition, about 80 percent of the marine ecosystem under watch was rated unhealthy or sub-healthy. To address the issue, the SOA will strictly supervise sources of pollution to seawater and introduce real-time monitoring. More will be done to close the illegal sewage outlets and control the number of those used by aquaculture.

Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

Site of sunken tanker Sanchi found

CHINA’S Ministry of Transportation said yesterday that the sunken oil tanker Sanchi has been located, and underwater robots will carry out further investigation. A marine surveillance ship detected the sunken tanker on Tuesday morning at a depth of 115 meters under the sea. Waste clearance is under way, the ministry said. The Shanghai marine search and rescue center dispatched 13 vessels on Tuesday to maintain order at the site, evacuate nearby merchant and fishing ships, and issue navigational warnings in both Chinese and English. Oil slicks have been found in waters around the ship that sank. Several ships are performing clean-up operations, according to the ministry. The Panama-registered oil tanker Sanchi, carrying 136,000 tons of light crude oil from Iran, collided with the CF Crystal, a Hong Kong-registered bulk freighter, about 300 kilometers east of the Yangtze estuary on January 6. All 32 crew members of the tanker, 30 Iranians and two Bangladeshis, were lost. Only three bodies have been found. The Sanchi sank on Sunday after a new and massive fire erupted, sending a cloud of black smoke a kilometer high. Satellite imaging showed a slick of 69 square kilometers and a second 40 sq km slick, which is less thick and not as concentrated, the State Oceanic Administration said.

Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

‘Ice flower boy’ spurs donation to poor kids

A LOCAL youth foundation in Yunnan Province has launched a fund-raising campaign after a boy covered in frost became an Internet sensation in China.Third-grader Wang Fuman received his frosted look and chapped cheeks after a 4.5km walk from his home to school on a freezing day in Ludian County.His teacher snapped a photo of him and posted it on WeChat. Wang’s story soon moved millions of Chinese netizens, who called him “ice flower boy,” with many making donations.The Youth Development Foundation of Zhaotong City had received more than 500,000 yuan (US$77,000) by Monday afternoon. The first batch of 100,000 yuan was delivered to rural schools, including Zhuanshanbao primary school where Wang studies.“The donations will be used to help poor left-behind children who live in regions with low temperatures overcome winter coldness,” said Chen Yu, office director with the foundation.Chen Furong, the county’s educational bureau head, said authorities plan to offer gloves, coats, hats and winter shoes to more than 1,300 students who study at schools at an altitude of more than 2,600 meters.

Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

Obsessively smelling, sniffing cats becoming national pastime

Zhou Shuaibo loves sniffing his orange Tabby cat and spends hours playing with his pet every day.Burying his face in the fluffy cat body and inhaling deeply while stroking its tummy, Zhou is one of China’s many “cat sniffers,” who obsessively smell and cuddle their cats multiple times a day.“As a veteran cat sniffer, if I don’t get my fix I feel absolutely terrible. I have a serious cat addiction,” says one cat-lover on Zhihu, China’s version of Quora.From clothes to cellphone covers designed with cat pictures, Zhou’s life is all about cats. If it is related to cats, Zhou will buy it.“My wife and I are not ready to have a child, so we give all our love to our cat,” says Zhou, 30, who works for a film company in east China’s Zhejiang Province.“My cat has supreme status at home,” Zhou says. Zhou even refers to himself a “shovel feces officer,” an unusual title taken on by many cat lovers in China.In addition to raising a real cat at home, Zhou also watches cat photographs and videos shared by cat owners on the Internet.The online phenomenon is known as “cloud cats,” and cat fans will check social media constantly throughout the day. Sometimes their passion is so strong that they even come to see other people’s cats as their own.On Zhihu, there are 180,000 followers of posts on cats, double the number of people who follow posts about dogs.Raising cats is big news in China, a lifestyle heavily focused on China’s “empty nest youth,” the unmarried who live alone in major cities.According to a report released by Alibaba, its e-commerce platform Taobao sold nearly 10 billion yuan (US$1.54 billion) of cat-related products in 2017, including cat food, clothes and accessories. More than 250,000 cat hair removal gloves were sold on Taobao last year. There were 17,000 cat-related products on the website.Du Fang, who works in a financial firm in Shanghai, spends about 10,000 yuan on his American shorthair cat every month, about one-fifth of his monthly salary. “My cat eats salmon and vitamins every day,” Du says. “A bag of cat food imported from Canada is 760 yuan, and the cat litter is made of Tofu.”The report said China’s youth were more willing to spend on novel products for their cats, such as automatic cat toilets and intelligent water dispensers.“I do not care how much I spend. I want my cat to be happy,” Du says.The popularity of cats has even spilled over into cat-themed coffee shops.“The coffee may taste bad in these shops where many cats are raised, but they are popular among Chinese youth and have become good places to make friends,” says Zhang Xuechen, who recently spent 15,000 yuan buying a cat.China’s empty nest youth make up a large portion of cat obsessives. Working in China’s big cities far from families, many find companionship in pets — and many youth have gone cat crazy.

Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

Bye bye China, hello Finland



Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)



Student built nano-satellite ready for liftoff

China’s first nano-satellite with primary and middle school students involved in the development and building process will be launched into space on Friday.The satellite, named after late Premier Zhou Enlai, was sent from its production base in Huai’an Youth Comprehensive Development Base in Jiangsu Province to Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China’s Gansu Province on Monday, where a CZ-11 solid fuel rocket is scheduled to put it into orbit Friday.Twenty teenagers who participated in the project accompanied the transport group to the launch center and will witness the liftoff. Zhang Xiang, chief designer of the satellite, said that the nano-satellite, weighing 2 kilograms, is set to run in sun-synchronous orbit. Equipped with an HD optical camera, it can capture space photos with the highest resolution among those shot by other Chinese satellites for scientific education purpose.Zhang said that the students had used their spare time to join the development and groundbased simulation performance of the satellite.

Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

Inside a nuclear power unit



Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

Glass bridges a rage at tourist spots

CHINESE tourist sites in the mountains are using glass bridges to attract visitors looking for excitement. Last month, a glass bridge called “Flying Dragon in the Sky” opened in Marenqifeng tourist area in Wuhu City, east China’s Anhui Province. The management of the tourist area touts it as a “skyhigh” high-tech glass bridge that “combines cultural elements and a unique experience.” “There is a dragon made of fiber reinforced plastics at both ends of the bridge, and smoke can billow from their mouths,” said an employee at the site. “The bridge also has light emitting diode displays on the surface, and when visitors step on the bridge, the equipment will show images and give out the sound of glass being shattered,” the employee said. “It is very exciting.” The 388-meter-long bridge hangs 180 meters above the ground. Similar bridges have popped up in other tourist spots in recent years. Last month, a 488-meter-long glass suspension bridge opened in Pingshan County in north China’s Hebei Province. The glass-bottom bridge stands four meters wide and hangs between two cliffs around 218m above the ground, about as high as a 66-story building, at Hongyagu scenic spot in the county. In Zhangjiajie, a tourist destination in central China, a 430-meter-long, six-meter-wide bridge hangs between two steep cliffs 300m above the ground. According to The Earth magazine, by the end of November 2016, more than 60 such glass bridges were being built or had been completed across the country. In 2017, more glass bridges appeared, particularly in provinces with mountains such as Jiangxi, Hunan and Yunnan. These provinces boast at least five glass bridges on average. “Walking on a transparent bridge is both exciting and nerve-racking,” said Li Jinxiang, a resident of Hefei, capital of Anhui Province. “You get nervous at every step you take,” he added. “Hearing the sounds of glass breaking and seeing the cracks on the display is a bit scary.” It has also led to viral videos recording tourists walking on the bridges, with many of them crying, laughing and lying on the bridges, refusing to walk on. But it has also raised a few eyebrows. In Anhui’s Anqing City, a glass-bottomed platform was built on a giant rock, the main attraction of the Jushi Mountains. Yimu, a seasoned tourism expert, said that the fervor behind the glass bridges needs to cool off. “It is understandable to add some new elements to attractions, but it is also important not to damage them,” Yimu said. “Instead of blindly following the trend, authorities should consider spending more money to improve tourism infrastructure at the tourist attractions.”

Source: Shanghai Daily: Nation | 18 Jan 2018 | 5:01 am(NZT)

Ex-CIA officer Jerry Chun Shing Lee held 'for spying for China'

Jerry Chun Shing Lee's arrest is thought to be linked to the crippling of the CIA spy network in China.

Source: BBC News - China | 18 Jan 2018 | 4:18 am(NZT)

Joshua Wong receives second jail term over 2014 protests

Joshua Wong, a leader of the protests, was found guilty of obstructing clearances of barricades.

Source: BBC News - China | 17 Jan 2018 | 5:14 pm(NZT)

China exam tests students on teacher names

Students who could not identify and name their teachers had 41 points deducted from their score.

Source: BBC News - China | 17 Jan 2018 | 2:45 am(NZT)

Seven-year-old delivery boy causes outrage in China

Photos of a child working as a delivery boy has sparked a debate over poverty on Chinese social media.

Source: BBC News - China | 17 Jan 2018 | 1:40 am(NZT)

China rights lawyer Yu Wensheng loses licence

Yu Wensheng has long been a frequent and vocal critic of the government.

Source: BBC News - China | 17 Jan 2018 | 12:50 am(NZT)

Huge oil spill left after burning tanker sinks off China

Fuel from the Sanchi has spread over more than 100 sq km and could badly damage marine life.

Source: BBC News - China | 16 Jan 2018 | 1:40 am(NZT)

The porn star who taught China about sex

Sora Aoi announced she was married on social media last week, sparking a frenzy on the Chinese internet.

Source: BBC News - China | 15 Jan 2018 | 1:05 pm(NZT)

China professor accused in #MeToo campaign is sacked

A student wrote on social media that he had tried to rape her - in a post read by millions.

Source: BBC News - China | 12 Jan 2018 | 11:53 pm(NZT)

Beijing, Moscow drill for potential missile warfare

China and Russia kicked off their second joint computer-assisted anti-missile drill on Monday, a move experts said could deter potential missile threats amid rising tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)

Beijing, Moscow drill for potential missile warfare

China and Russia kicked off their second joint computer-assisted anti-missile drill on Monday, a move experts said could deter potential missile threats amid rising tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)



Education, health fees among key concerns

China to legislate on preschool education

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)

International group praises green revival

A high-level international advisory body applauded China's efforts to improve the environment and suggested a 15-year strategy against pollution in a draft recommendation report on Monday.

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)

Memorial Day a time to 'remember', 'inspire'

A memorial service to mark the 80th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre committed during the War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression (1931-45) brought together hundreds of activists and members of the Chinese and other Asian communities on Sunday in San Francisco.

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)

Education, health fees among key concerns

China to legislate on preschool education

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)

Memorial Day a time to 'remember', 'inspire'

A memorial service to mark the 80th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre committed during the War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression (1931-45) brought together hundreds of activists and members of the Chinese and other Asian communities on Sunday in San Francisco.

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)

International group praises green revival

A high-level international advisory body applauded China's efforts to improve the environment and suggested a 15-year strategy against pollution in a draft recommendation report on Monday.

Source: China Daily > China News | (NZT)












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